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CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 6:00am EST
crushing of eastern europe, 1944-1956." >> why do you open with a quote from churchill? >> he coined the expression iron curtain. it was such an evocative escription of what happened, when he gave the speech that i thought it was important to put that the beginning of the book. >> did you ever think of what he called that the iron curtain? >> there is a long story. it is a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the questi
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are bound together monetarily. missouri and washington state are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a facto
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, an
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00pm EST
budget. david cameron's bench urges him to stand up to europe. >> i support absolutely. >> the ugly spector of child abuse hits the deadlines with some dramatic consequences. lord justin levison delivers his plan on press standards. >> we should be wary of any legislation that has the potential to infringe free speech and a free press. >> the queen sits in on a cabinet meeting at number 10. but let's begin with the subject which has dominated politics and our pockets for many months, the state of our economy. at the start of december the chancellor came to deliver his autumn statement or mini budget. it set out the latest figures for the growth, tax and benefits. among the headlines the scrapping of a planned rise in fuel tax. a 1% rise in working benefits an an increase at the threshold in which people begin to pay tax. he would have to extend austerity measures until 2015. >> the deficit is coming down, coming down this year and every year of this parliament. yes, the deficit is far too high for comfort. we cannot relax our efforts to make our economy safe. but britain is heading
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00pm EST
anne applebaum discusses her new boat -- book, "iron curtain: the crushing of eastern europe, 1944-1956." >> why do you open with a quote from churchill? >> heat. the expression -- he coined the expression iron curtain. it was such an evocative description of what happened when he gave the speech that i thought it was important to put that the beginning of the book. >> did you ever think of what he called that the iron curtain? >> there is a long story. it is a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- baltimore, berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first spoke -
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunit
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00am EST
securitization around the world. the u.s. is a heavy user of credit products. europe is a distant second. it gives you a backdrop of the credit availability. this gives you some backdrop that the markets in the united states have come back to an extent if you look at the various asset classes. not as many people buying cars. the market is functioning. most of the student loans are going under the government's balance sheet. different loan obligations -- this data is a little bit old. $50 billion and that market is rapidly returning. this is the slide that everybody talks about, the dramatic change in how mortgage credit is made in the united states over the past six years. securitization of volumes have gone up by $300 billion in the past six years. private credit is a huge volume. $700 billion put through the private label security system. $22 billion is overstating it. of all the slides i have, this is the most telling about where the credit is coming from. it's coming to fannie and freddie and fha. 90% of loans are effectively being guaranteed by the government. it is not just
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 7:00am EST
europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be done. if something is done in the first few weeks of january tha
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:30pm EST
happened there. >> what are the residuals from two today in i eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 8:00pm EST
quote is the most vulnerable who are the victims, which we are seeing in europe. many feel they have nowhere to turn. we must never let that happen here. and election has come and gone. the people have made their choice. policy-makers still have a duty to choose between ideas that work and those that do not. when one economic policy after another has failed our working families, it is no answer to expressed compassion for them or create government programs that offer promise but do not create reforms. we must come together to advance new strategies for the the people out of poverty. let's go with what works. looking around this room at the men and women who are carrying legacy, i know we are answering the call. this cause is right. jack kemp started this. we know the good fight for the american ideal wood -- will go on until we reach all people. thank you for coming in here this evening. thank you for having us this night. congratulations to marco. [applause]
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 1:00pm EST
being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cabl
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00pm EST
europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire further belligerence. our extended hand
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:35pm EST
change the central or eastern europe -- long period of time of change than central or eastern europe faced. the main argument is, it is upon us, and more change is coming. some of that will include islamist forces and the need to figure out how to best use our power to shape and influence their transition. >> on to rob. >> a couple of closing points. first, generally we tend to project exceed a certain bigotry of low expectations on muslims in the arab cultural world. those of us who are various religious faiths here know the extent to which we practice our faith is and how faithful we are to this or that religious prescription. we know that we fall pretty short, but we think, muslims all pray five times a day, they never touched a scotch. they all do every commandment in islam. and they submit to the will of their local imam, et cetera. it does not work that way. moslem practice in general is not so different than general practice here. muslims want the political the way that we want to be political. let us not fall prey to the bigotry of low expectations that they cannot make reaso
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 1:00am EST
recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. by effectively taking his hand and pushing it into the future, grabbing value that had not been generated. -- that is debt. producing the wealth, from which they hoped they would pay the debt. moneylenders, bankers. covering the fact that he had already paid wages, hoping that there would be something less for -- left for him. the fact that there is recycling -- you take a value for the future, bring it into the present, so as to
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00am EST
, europe is in a terrible recession. they have huge debt problems. you have bigger problems in asia than you thought we would have a. ande can get this one right actually make a real road to bring in new revenue and reduce our costs so that we bring our budget into balance, i think it is a huge opportunity for economic revival in america that around the globe will make us proud and create jobs. it is tough. if the president gets its right, we have a huge ability to see an economic revival we have all been waiting for. >> let me follow up on a ci. specific point. you said earlier that indicating it should be up to states to tailor programs when it comes to implementing certain aspects of obamacare. should states have this flexibility? flexibility? >>
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 6:55pm EST
vulnerable who are the victims, which we are seeing in europe. many feel they have nowhere to turn. we must never let that happen here. and election has come and gone. the people have made their choice. policy-makers still have a duty to choose between ideas that work and those that do not. when one economic policy after another has failed our working families, it is no answer to expressed compassion for them or create government programs that offer promise but do not create reforms. we must come together to advance new strategies for the the people out of poverty. let's go with what works. looking around this room at the men and women who are carrying on jack kemp's legacy, i know we are answering the call. this cause is right. jack kemp started this. we know the good fight for the american ideal wood -- will go on until we reach all people. thank you for coming in here this evening. thank you for having us this night. congratulations to marco. [applause] >> now senator marco rubio was honoree he discussed policy recommendations he believes that will help all families regardless of cl
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 6:00am EST
properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out n
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:30pm EST
mention the national interest clauses in the statement on europe on monday. i think this can only be triggered if there are emergency conditions, but i will look carefully at what he said. >> the prime minister told the house universal credit-card to put in work incentives for all people of -- all levels of income. why then does the department nasa universal credit will mean working women will consider getting off work? >> that is not the case at all. universal credit means, because we are bringing different benefits together, what it means is people will always be better off in a work and peak -- in work and working extra hours. they have 13 years to -- had 13 years to sort out the poverty traps and failed. >> mark spencer. >> my constituent is currently stuck in cuba, despite having a british passport. i wonder if the prime minister could encourage cuban authorities to look with speed to try to get him back with his family for christmas. >> i understand why my friend raises this case -- he was born in cuba and entered the u.k., but obtained a british passport in 1997. we are in reg
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 7:00pm EST
is greater in absolute dollars than it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities fo
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 1:00am EST
we called eastern europe is very differentiated. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more on life and soviet east germany sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> punched me, to me, take things from me. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i have been on that bus and they are as good as gold. >> all of us were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have no words for, other than adolescents. finally, people are starting to stand back and say, this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal right of passage. there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say, this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up for award winning film by gathering essays. -- her toward women -- her award winning film by gathering essays. >> the fiscal cliff negotiations, with p
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 6:00am EST
now. if you want to look like the way europe has been growing, we will have a small consolidation, such as the small consolidation proposed by the president. if you want to have the kind of growth that i hope we can have with a bigger consolidation, that one is being proposed by speaker boehner. >> thank you. >> i would like to focus on something that is probably more of interest to the economists and ordinary people. let's talk about ratios. what i heard you lay out, dr. zandi, was more of an ideal situation. they get you at roughly at $3 trillion. deficit-reduction over the course of 10 years. you went on to add the $1.20 trillion over last year's negotiations on the debt ceiling. the negotiations over last year's debt ceiling -- the new number would really be 1-1. that is not actually my question. i want to get to now. we have looked at the president's offer. we haven't found any spending reductions at all. we found the $1.6 trillion tax increases. the stimulus spending,we saw the extension of the unemployment insurance, which is an increase in spending. the delay in the spendi
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 12:35am EST
try to get a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00am EST
parallels social territory. -- perilous social territory. europe is experiencing the widespread waning of the religious impulse. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory, and ask, with peggy lee, is that all there is? when people decide that the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no transcendent meaning, when they conclude that life should be filled to overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to as which -- assuage the boredom. they might give up the excitements of politics. we know from experience of the bloodsoaked 20th century, the political consequences of this. political nature in the horror of the vacuum. the vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting. fascism and communism. fascism -- a meaningful life of racial estimate. communism, adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history is unfolding destiny. the excruciating political paradox of modernity is this. secularism advanced as part of a moral revolution against the bloody history of religious strife. even those of us who are me
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecologically that were not good for the earth's, thing
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 6:00am EST
posture very specifically. while we had a lot of forces in europe, at sea and on land, it is not reasonable they could have responded. this was over in a matter of 20- 30 minutes with respect to special mission specifically. and we had no forces ready or tethered, if you will, to focus on the mission. to go there was no mention of the cia report despite their close to the pact and more personal than they had diplomats. did they share --- >> we cannot discuss classified organizations. >> thank you all very much. >> two committees are holding hearings today on the attack on the consulate in libya that killed four americans. the senate foreign relations committee. we will hear from william burns and others at 8:00 eastern. you can see that live on c- span2. he will go to the other side of the capital in the afternoon to testify before the house foreign affairs committee about the libya report. that is live on c-span3 at 1:00 eastern. in a few moments, today's headlines and your calls live on "washington journal." the house is in session at noon eastern to hear plan be addressing the
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 6:00am EST
europe is having the problems they are having and, as a result, the world has excess savings and are doing the investment and do not have a great choice. they look at us and say, we are better. interest rates fell. we are living on borrowed time. why they are playing political games when there is such a real issue. we are self-dealing in our own debt. >> the federal reserve is the largest holder of u.s. date. purges in over 70% of all new u.s. debt issuances. if you look at people who are buying our debt, their appetite is getting less, not greater. they are buying short-term debt because of huge interest rates risks. if you look at china in particular, they are looking for corporate bonds rather than u.s. treasury securities because they do not like what they see. we are living on borrowed time. we have created another bubble. my view is the reason the fed is doing that is because the mandate was changed in the late 70's to where they have to be concerned with unemployment. we need a fiscal deal. the fed is the onlythe fed has to change its policy unsustainable over time. >> right.
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 1:00pm EST
as he could and so he volunteered to be in the ambulance service. what he did when he got to europe was rescue and pick up other dough boys in europe out of those trenches and get them behind, take them back behind american lines so that they could be taken care of their wounds and he also picked up many of our americans, 114,000 to be exact that died in the great world war i. he was allowed or was able to come back to america alive he made it through the war. although many, as i mentioned, did not. many americans when they came home from the great war over there, as cohen said, difed the new. they picked up in europe in fact many of them a great number of them depride the spanish flu, almost as many as died in europe itself. frank buckles then went to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and liberated the camp and he along with the other prisoners of war came back to am
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:30pm EST
charitable purposes in europe. it is very difficult to give service in europe. when i was asking people, they said, why would we serve? there is a bureau for that. there are some places in europe burk it is illegal to give volunteer service. as i see the united states going in the same trend of all sourcing -- outsourcing, it is so overregulated and so over controlling of your life, it takes away your freedom to even support yourself, how would you propose the government relinquished power is that it has taken over peacefully? how do you think the government would be able to let go of this control of our lives? >> i agree with every syllable you just said. [laughter] you almost provoked me to be more political than i felt comfortable doing in this chapel. leave more space, more breathing room for civil society. this astonishing combustion of voluntary association. in my remarks, i used the analogy of a tree. in the shade of which, smaller things cannot grow. that is the danger of an excess of state. >> [inaudible] how can we get them to take the laws out? [applause] >> we are almost out
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 10:00am EST
exile them internally in central europe. they encourage more scientists and engineers. the founders would have known this. you need the historians and philosophers to look way over the cliff to the mountains and beyond. talking about creating incentives to do -- you have to have people that are imaginative who can look beyond the current crisis. that has been part of the american middle class, new ideas. >> i agree with that. i would like more of an emphasis on science and math. in terms of the k through 8th grade. >> absolutely. a young physicist learning how to do problem sets started going back to the questions of uncertainty and the relativity theory and became more philosophical. if you're just doing problem sets, you are not thinking about the deeper ideas or setting the framework for thinking will be on the cliff to the future. >> do you have a question? >> i fear that we have a burgeoning student loan problem in our country. it is the only form of consumer debt that has increased substantially. people don't have the jobs. look at it on an apples to apples basis. very high de
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
international companies that are looking where to invest with the challenges in europe, with china going through a transition, with india's political system, as chair of the india caucus, almost more dysfunctional than ours. we look pretty darn good if we can put a real plan in place. >> what would be the size of the plan? >> i think it gets north of $4 trillion, whether it gets to $6 trillion. this goes back to where you start. two points -- kind of on the opening round questions. it is important to remember that the simpson-bowles plan, which has gained a lot of attention, or the gang of six, which is built off the simpson-bowles, the presumptions that went into those plans assumed that all the top rates would go back up. when you start from that, even though i think simpson-bowles's idea that he would bring the rates down to the high 20's is a bit of a stretch. i do not think we will see that kind of across the board almost zeroing out in some places of tax expenditures that would require. they can show a path towards meaningful tax reform even with the rates at the higher level. poin
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
approaching what is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to assuage the board m, then they may become susceptible to the excitements of politics that promise assets meaning and spurs alleviations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this if it's meaninglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revoluti
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 7:00am EST
25%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it wa
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 5:00pm EST
, on roads and bridges, on doing nation building right in their home. europe spends 5%. the united states spends less than 3% of its economy on infrastructure improvements. so, the need is very clear. so as this congress, is washington responding to the need? well, not really. not really. think about this for a moment. this congress will spend $105 billion next year on rebuilding the roads and bridges of this nation. a nation of 300 million people, where every objective observer understands the need for infrastructure investment. so less than $53 billion in each of the next two years. we can't spend any more, right? well, wait a minute, you just spent $89 billion rebuilding the roads and bridges of afghanistan . you spent $67 building the roads and bridges of iraq. those nations are 30 million and 26 million respectively. yet for a nation of 300 million people you could only come up with less than $53 billion in each of the next two years. when the american society of civil engineers says, just to bring your infrastructure to a state of good repair, it will cost you $2.2 trillion,
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and high schools. about the role of private enterprise in solving the problems. i believe that no import technology ever becomes broadly used unless it is commercialized and is an innovation that people want to use. there are smart people like the one building a private space company or another founder who has a fund in silicon valley. smart people who are trying to use private enterprise to solve big problems. i did not discount that. government and academia has its role. one has talked a lot about going to mars. he hopes to die on mars as a first human columnisonist. we had to build 30 saturn-5 rockets, each exerting 7 million pounds of thrust. n out ofhasn't gotte low-earth orbit. going to mars is like building the pyramids. it is something that a single nation cannot easily do i
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 7:00am EST
little difficulty in distinguishing ourselves from the crisis that is in gulf and europe and especially greece. the other thing we could do is come to a midline course of action where you could actually -- what can you minimally due to cut spending? what can you minimally due to have shared sacrifice so everyone is sacrificing something in this game? the other thing we don't talk about -- the interest rates on the deficit have been the lowest in 200 years. if we went back to what it was 50 years ago, it would triple. ishave not got to thin leaderst not about being popular or well- liked. he may lose his leadership role. in the end, he would have saved this country from fiscal disaster, from bankruptcy, and a crisis that will affect all americans them that all americans. . all americans. host: what would you like to see done? is this a united opinion on the right when it comes to how it should be handled? guest: let's take the impact of the tax policies. that is a very good question. if you are a worker making $60,000 a year, head of household, and if your income bracket is $6
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 5:00pm EST
. but pago is roughly the size of western europe. there are about 6000 deployed. no, that is the minusco, 6000 deployed in the east purdum i do not know the exact number of the congolese military in the east because it is a vast amount of area they are trying to cover with military troops. >> why is this such a big issue for the drc in order to be able to basically prevail in this situation? >> a slight provision -- revision. i think probably today, the m23 probably has up to 2000 troops. the sign -- i think he has pointed out the size of the congo, but i think it is important to graphically described the congo as a country that is as large as the eastern part of the united states from the atlantic to the mississippi. it is an enormous country, and since the split of sudan, it is geographically the largest in africa. the eastern congo is one of the most of a cold areas in which to operate -- one of the most difficult areas in which to operate. it is deeply for arrested in some places. and in -- is deeply forested. in some cases, a double and triple canopies. some areas have volca
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:20pm EST
nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to assuage the board m, then they may become susceptible to the excitements of politics that promise assets meaning and spurs alleviations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this if it's meaninglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revolution against the histo
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 2:00pm EST
and philosophers and they got them to go west or they exile them internally in central europe. they encourage more scientists and engineers. the founders would have known this. you need the historians and philosophers to look way over the cliff to the mountains and beyond. talking about creating incentives to do -- you have to have people that are imaginative who can look beyond the current crisis. that has been part of the american middle class, new ideas. >> i agree with that. i would like more of an emphasis on science and math. in terms of the k through 8th grade. >> absolutely. a young physicist learning how to do problem sets started going back to the questions of uncertainty and the relativity theory and became more philosophical. if you're just doing problem sets, you are not thinking about the deeper ideas or setting the framework for thinking will be on the cliff to the future. >> do you have a question? >> i fear that we have a burgeoning student loan problem in our country. it is the only form of consumer debt that has increased substantially. people don't have the jobs.
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 1:00am EST
about the reforms that were taking place in europe. i asked, would any of these reforms be taking place without europe being in a fiscal crisis mode? her answer was, absolutely not. unless the revolver is at the temple of the politicians with the finger on the trigger, they're not capable of summoning the collective will to tell the people that represent that they need to take steps to resolve a problem and will cause disappointment and pain to do so. my experience in the years i have had in politics was exactly that. we never would have gotten what we did in 2011 without the threat of defaulting on our debt. to think that we could put a structure in place today that perhaps we would all be comfortable with in terms of solving our long-term problems and be assured that 10 years or not that congress would not have modified that dozens of times to the response of into joints who are banging on the door and saying this is to develop much pain, we could hardly sustain a policy for months around here, let alone 10 years. if you want to fix the long-term situation, i think there is cons
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 5:00pm EST
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the other half
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 8:00pm EST
, one of things that happened since 1989 is the region we used call eastern europe. these countries don't have things in common with one another. >> more with ann alpbaum from the end of world war ii. from her narrative "iron curtain" sunday night on c-span's q&a. "washington journal" today looked a at the fiscal cliff negotiations with particular look at the found daises. the first we spoke to an associated press reporter. >> our series on the so-call fiscal cliff continues with a dive into social security. here to talk about the program and how it is involved in these discussions, negotiations over the america's financial future. here is stephen ohlemacher. thank you for being here. how many people in america receive social security? >> a little bit more than 56 million people get social security. the average benefit is a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it is like $13,000, $14,000 a year. >> we're talking about retirees but also the disabled. >> yes, fairly wide group of people get social security benefits, retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widower
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 8:00pm EST
can tell you that the united states as well as europe and many other countries including eventually china because of our current demographic situation, we will turn to immigration increasingly because our ter tilt is approaching below replacement level so immigration will be a necessity. the chinese are thinking about the fact their one child policy is going to lead to them having a much older population soon with fewer children. so immigration becomes another way they can continue the economic vitality of their country. so to me immigration and vitality are closely linked. i think that's true for many business people in the united states and the university. not too sure about the politicians. >> i think we have to remind people the story of america is a story of immigration. some of the most iconic companies in the country were founded by immigrants. it's been the history for a long time. i believe the reason it's so sensitive now is the debate around immigration is the debate around illegal immigration and there needs to be more focus on legal immigration and less about the proble
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:05am EST
europe in most studies in terms of the outcomes. i think about what is different -- we are investing a boat load. are we going to see anywhere near the delivery services? i would like to see us be the global leader. >> there are certainly challenges in that area. a couple of them are you look at the demographics -- most of the damage -- health care in the country is delivered by medical groups of less than five practitioners. it is like the cadre in government -- they are all middle-aged and above. like trying to imagine we're going to run a food delivery system by a network of corner stores. certainly there are challenges, but the confluence of where citizens are looking, the need, the availability -- it is an arena. >> i think it will be in three core areas -- national security, we are you see things become less encumbered and less partisan. also, driven as much by local government as anything. third, we have not talked about education. the reason i think education, there is a tremendous amount of untapped research in sight that makes sense -- i should not say makes sense, is there f
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
where to go. >> let's go to the floor for questions. >> my name is gloria. i come from europe. everybody talks about [indiscernible] most of us [indiscernible] we are the only ones that can produce babies. i was wondering with the crazy schedule you mentioned working until midnight how you balance family time and a career. the mother is the most important role in the family and for the child. the child is the future of everything we're talking about. how can a woman in the united states be independent with a career if she has had a child with no maternity leave? united states is way behind most other countries. they have maternity leave. there should not be fair when she goes to an interview -- there should not be fear when going to an interview. >> does anyone want to take that? >> i would be happy to do that. >> i have always gotten up at 4:30 or 5:00. i have a son. he is grown of now. when i get up, he is off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers. that really helps a lot. over the years, i made choices on what i would do in order to create th
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:35am EST
storms and europe will particularly suffer from them. but when you get a hurricane embedded within one, then you get double dose and that's what happened with sandy and that kind of thing will happen, too if we get stronger cyclonic storms. and the damage goes like the cube of the wind speed. so it's not like -- you know, if the wind speed had been 10 miles per hour less, we wouldn't have had all that damage. those trees have been standing there for centuries. these were really big trees on our property. so there haven't been storms like that, or those trees wouldn't still have been there. >> and was there a human fingerprint on sandy? could you say how much climate change contributed to the ferocity and the intensity of sandy? >> well, there's a human fingerprint in several ways. the ocean was unusually warm along the eastern seaboard and it was warmer by more than the global average, so people are saying, oh, you can only credit one quarter of that to global warming. well, the warming, it's like, these extreme events that we're getting, we're getting them much more frequently. of
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